SOW: Year 7 Jewellery Box

Mr Liver

The following is the extract from our Year 7 Long Term plan showing what we develop in the Jewellery Box SOW:

Jew Box.PNG

Here is a copy of the student workbooklet (Jewellery_Box_Student_Workbooklet)

You will see that the front cover identifies what the assessment pieces will be for this project. We don’t assess every piece on every project, just that, across the 3 projects they do in one year they are assessed on each piece twice. For example assessed on Product Analysis in their first and third project but not their second. This saves some time and means different projects focus on different aspects.

When you get to the relevant page of each assessment piece (for example page 4 shows the product analysis) you will see an ‘assessment ticket’ in the top right hand corner. This enables the assessment criteria to be clear to staff and students before they complete the…

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GCSE Computer Science Assessments

As part of my marking and assessment routines established with my GCSE Computer Science group I have built in the following assessments at the end of each half term.

Assessment 1

Assessment 2

Assessment 3

Assessment 4

Assessment 5

Assessment 6

 

Other posts of interest:

Setting High Expectations in GCSE Computer Science

Resource: GCSE Computer Science Revision

Programming Challenges

Demystifying the destination in Technology

What does this mean?

Teachers are clear what success looks like before embarking on a topic. This is then passed onto the students so that they know what success looks like. Students know what they need to be able to say and/or do. Students are almost completely independent of the teacher as they understand how to improve their work, the resources to help themselves and can identify themselves what to do next.

 

Strategies

In our workbooklets we ensure that when students complete a piece of work that is going to be marked that the “assessment criteria” has been clearly identified first of all with teachers but then students are clear of the success criteria by printing it as a ticket on the same page.

Product analysis page

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Secondly, so that students know what they need to do, and help themselves and know what to do next we have scrolling images on the TV in each workshop which they can use to help themselves. When you press F5 and play the presentation it will continuously loop until ESC is pressed. Some examples are below:

Product Analysis Lesson Scroll

Design Spec Lesson Scroll

Design Ideas Lesson Scroll

Evaluation Lesson Scroll

 

Other posts that may interest you:

Resource: DT Homework and Assessment

SOW: GCSE DT

GCSE Resistant Materials Exam Questions

Setting High Expectations in GCSE Computer Science

Setting High Expectations in my GCSE Computer Science lessons comes from building this as a culture and routine from the outset. The culture I aim to achieve is one where the students in my class are keen and eager to improve and are aiming to reach and exceed their target grade and that levels of progress are significantly raised. I am wanting students to give their best on each topic and produce their best high quality work.

An important part of the routine and culture I have embedded is one where students take responsibility for their own learning, act on feedback, improve results, are resilient, are clear what is expected of them and know they can achieve more.

Consider the following:

  • Do you see a students target grade as a MINIMUM expectation?
  • How do you promote the idea of raising levels of progress and exceeding MINIMUM expectation?
  • Do you expect students to give their best for every topic?
  • How do you ensure students give their best for every topic?
  • How do you train students to be more resilient?
  • Do you train students to care about the quality of their work?
  • How do you instil a growth mind-set?
  • Do you model high expectations?

Strategies

Expectations and routines – One thing I do is ensure that students know what is expected of them and that there are “no surprises”.  For example in Year 10 we alternated between theory and programming lessons. They knew what they were doing when they came in the room. I always set homework once a week, and is always set on the same day, eg every Thursday and always due in in the same day, eg every Tuesday. It helps get students in routines and into this culture of there being a certain expectation. This half term a plan was given to them, again to help with building this idea of no surprises and knowing what the expectation and routine is.

11plan

Teacher/student agreements –

rules4work.PNG

Help Desk/Enable Table – Have a table in your classroom where students can access help resources, templates, examples, success criteria to help them when they are stuck. Have
boxes/packs of resources that can be brought out ready to use per topic. This helps build resilience. I also have an electronic help desk with resources.

Mark presentation –  When marking students work do not let poorly presented work pass by. On top of the mark for each homework I give a mark out of 2 for presentation. Students soon quickly learn to meet the high expectations for presentation as it’s an easy 2 marks to score.

Marking work – Each week students receive homework questions similar to past paper questions where a raw score is given and here are some strategies I use:

  • Personal Best – Students plot their personal best on a graph which gets them in the mind-set of always trying to beat their personal best. They don’t compare themselves with others but focus on own performance.
  • Average score – I use electronic mark books to keep track of students marks and average score. I feedback the average score to students on a regular basis (written at the end of each homework) and let them see the impact their work is having on their overall average. They are usually motivated to work hard and see it improve.
  • Resits and Retests – Don’t accept work that isn’t good enough. Have a pass mark that students need to achieve for a piece of work in relation to their target grade (or even stretching them) and ask them to re do pieces of work that aren’t up to standard. Reinforce this and soon they will work harder to get it right first time.
Markbook snippet
Snippet of electronic markbook which automatically averages all scores.
markbookprintour
The markbook can then produce printouts for each student

Other posts that may be of interest:

Resource: GCSE Computer Science Revision

GCSE Computer Science Assessments

Resource: OOP Questions

Programming Challenges

SOW: AQA Tech Award Materials Technology

Here are some SOW, Lesson plans and resources I have created for delivering the AQA Tech Award in Materials Technology over the first half term.

Long Term Planning Yr10 Mt

Scheme of work and resources for some theory lessons

1. Metals, Alloys and Timbers

Tech Award Metals, alloys and Timbers

Practical resources for Unit 1

Unit One Skills Demonstration Portfolio

 

Other posts of interest: GCSE Resistant Materials Exam Questions

SOW: GCSE DT

Please use the links below to see a SOW I have written for the new AQA GCSE DT for the first half term of Year 10.

Long Term Planning Yr10 DT

Scheme of work and theory resources

1. Material Categories and the work of others

Papers and Boards Lesson
Metals and Polymers lesson
Textiles lesson
Timbers lesson
The work of others 1 lesson
The work of others 2 lesson

Homework and assessment resources

Resource: DT Homework and Assessment

Hammer Practical Project

Project Checklist
Pin Hammer Head underlay
Brasing qu
Callipers qu
Finishes qu
Joining qu

Other posts of interest: SOW: AQA Tech Award Materials Technology

Resource: DT Homework and Assessment

Here are three homework tasks I intend to use over the first half of the Autumn term along with some marking guidance.

Hwk 1 – Games Controller Storage Design Brief and Ideas Student Task
Hwk 1 – Games Controller Storage Design Brief and Ideas Teacher Marking Guidance

Hwk 2 – Games Controller Storage Development and Evaluation Student Task
Hwk 2 – Games Controller Storage Development and Evaluation Teacher Making Guidance

Hwk 3 – Questions about tools
Hwk 3 – Questions about tools marking guidance for teachers

Here is an end of half term test I plan to use around the October half term

Assessment Aut 1

Other posts of interest: SOW: GCSE DT

Resource: GCSE Computer Science Revision

These revision packs have been created by taking all the old A451 papers and splitting the questions out by topic so that students can complete and master one topic at a time. By completing all the revision packs they will still have completed all the past papers.

It also helps staff see what is required for each topic and the type of questions that have been asked.

I know A451 is now legacy spec but most of the topics and questions will still be relevant. I will add the Summer 2017 questions in due course.

I usually set students an individual pass mark, securely above their target grade, and they have to keep doing the revision pack until they get their pass mark. Throughout Year 11 I set 1 lesson a fortnight a side to complete revision packs and students would do the one they were up to. Obviously some students completed them first time and moved on to the next whilst others took an attempt, feedback, and then another attempt to secure their pass mark.

These were also used for homework in Year 11 and were made available to students to use as part of their revision close to the exam.

1. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 1 Logic Gates
2. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 2 Data Representation
3. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 3 Computer Systems

4. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 4 Input Output Storage
5. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 5 Software
6. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 6 Networks
7. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 7 The Internet
8. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 8 Databases
9. GCSE Computing Revision Pack 9 Programming

I do not take credit for any of the content inside the revision packs these are simply existing content published by OCR in their past exam papers (which can be found here). All I have simply done is group the questions by topic.

Other posts you may be interested in: Programming Challenges





Resource: OOP Questions

Some resources and ideas on an OOP lesson I’d like to share.

Each student would receive a copy of this workbooklet: Workbook OOP

There is a presentation here to go through some of the theory with students: Object Oriented Programming

As I deliver the presentation there are some spaces for notes on pages 2,3 and 4 for students to make notes so that they are actively listening during the presentation.

We would then move onto page 5 where students would have a go at answering the two questions. They would then collect a copy of the mark schemes (Help Desk Mark Schemes) so that they could mark their own. Alternatively they could be peer marked using these slips and stapled to the page (Peer assessment slips)

They then on page 5 would use their answers and information gathered from looking at the mark schemes to create a success criteria individually and then shared with the class to check it was correct. Things I would expect to see on there would be parent class at the top, with sub classes underneath, name of class in a box, arrows drawn between classes, arrows pointing upwards etc.

They would then do the same for class definitions across pages 7,8 and 9. The question has a model within it which they can use to help them, they have a go at the questions, and mark schemes are available on a help desk. They would then construct themselves a success criteria for class definitions and this would be shared and finalised with the class.

Now that they have completed some example questions for class definitions and inheritance diagrams, reviewed them, and created a success criteria for each they are in a position to answer June 2014 Question 8 using the knowledge, their success criteria and mistakes they may have made from the practice questions.

Other posts you may be interested in: Resource: GCSE Computer Science Revision

 

SOW: Year 7 Jewellery Box

The following is the extract from our Year 7 Long Term plan showing what we develop in the Jewellery Box SOW:

Jew Box.PNG

Here is a copy of the student workbooklet (Jewellery_Box_Student_Workbooklet)

You will see that the front cover identifies what the assessment pieces will be for this project. We don’t assess every piece on every project, just that, across the 3 projects they do in one year they are assessed on each piece twice. For example assessed on Product Analysis in their first and third project but not their second. This saves some time and means different projects focus on different aspects.

When you get to the relevant page of each assessment piece (for example page 4 shows the product analysis) you will see an ‘assessment ticket’ in the top right hand corner. This enables the assessment criteria to be clear to staff and students before they complete the task. It makes marking more efficient as all the teacher has to do is tick off the criteria the student has demonstrated and then write a meaningful target using the criteria. It helps with consistenty of marking across the department.

For example a student might get numbers 1 and 2 ticked off and then the target might read something like “To improve this product analysis or one in the future you should include: another point from each part of ACCESS FM to analyse the product in more detail”

The following are displayed on the board when the students complete their assessment pieces of work to show how they can push, stretch and challenge themselves, to make their work better. Success Criteria Product Analysis Success Criteria Specification Success Criteria Evaluation

We also have some resources that can be on the board and scroll automatically round to help students: 
Product Analysis Lesson Scroll

Design Spec Lesson Scroll
 Evaluation Lesson Scroll
Wood Scroll

A full scheme of work for this project can be found here: JewelleryBox Short Term Planning KS3 Technology

A range of extra extension tasks can be found here to slot into lessons or for students to complete if they finish something or are waiting for a machine etc:

Types of wood
Types of wood 2
Where does wood come from
JB Plan of making
Jewellery Box Extension Work 1
Jewellery Box Extension Work 2
Jewellery Box Extension Work 3

Other posts you may be interested in: Resource: DT Homework and Assessment

Demystifying the destination in Technology